amandaonwriting:

The Top 10 Best Opening Lines Of Novels1. Cat’s Eye, Margaret Atwood, 1998“Time is not a line but a dimension, like the dimensions of space.”2. Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury, 1953“It was a pleasure to burn.”3. Gone With The Wind, Margaret Mitchell, 1936“Scarlett O’Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charm as the Tarleton twins were.”4. The Gunslinger, Stephen King, 1982“The man in Black fled across the Desert, and the Gunslinger followed.”5. The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkien, 1937“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.6. Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov, 1955“Lolita. Light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul.”7. Middlesex, Jeffrey Eugenides, 2002“I was born twice: first, as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974.”8. Peter and Wendy, J. M. Barrie, 1911“All children, except one, grow up.”9. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen, 1813“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.”10. Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut, 1969“All this happened, more or less.”
by Meredith Borders via LitReactor

amandaonwriting:

The Top 10 Best Opening Lines Of Novels
1. Cat’s Eye, Margaret Atwood, 1998
“Time is not a line but a dimension, like the dimensions of space.”
2. Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury, 1953
“It was a pleasure to burn.”
3. Gone With The Wind, Margaret Mitchell, 1936
“Scarlett O’Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charm as the Tarleton twins were.”
4. The Gunslinger, Stephen King, 1982
“The man in Black fled across the Desert, and the Gunslinger followed.”
5. The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkien, 1937
“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.
6. Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov, 1955
“Lolita. Light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul.”
7. Middlesex, Jeffrey Eugenides, 2002
“I was born twice: first, as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974.”
8. Peter and Wendy, J. M. Barrie, 1911
“All children, except one, grow up.”
9. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen, 1813
“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.”
10. Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut, 1969
“All this happened, more or less.”

by Meredith Borders via LitReactor

(via avolavit)

Obscure Color Words

albicant: whitish; becoming white
amaranthine: immortal; undying; deep purple-red colour
aubergine: eggplant; a dark purple colour
azure: light or sky blue; the heraldic colour blue
celadon: pale green; pale green glazed pottery
cerulean: sky-blue; dark blue; sea-green
chartreuse: yellow-green colour
cinnabar: red crystalline mercuric sulfide pigment; deep red or scarlet colour
citrine: dark greenish-yellow
eburnean: of or like ivory; ivory-coloured
erythraean: reddish colour
flavescent: yellowish or turning yellow
greige: of a grey-beige colour
haematic: blood coloured
heliotrope: purplish hue; purplish-flowered plant; ancient sundial; signalling mirror
hoary: pale silver-grey colour; grey with age
isabelline: greyish yellow
jacinthe: orange colour
kermes: brilliant red colour; a red dye derived from insects
lovat: grey-green; blue-green
madder: red dye made from brazil wood; a reddish or red-orange colour
mauve: light bluish purple
mazarine: rich blue or reddish-blue colour
russet: reddish brown
sable: black; dark; of a black colour in heraldry
saffron: orange-yellow
sarcoline: flesh-coloured
smaragdine: emerald green
tilleul: pale yellowish-green
titian: red-gold, reddish brown
vermilion: bright red
virid: green
viridian: chrome green
xanthic: yellow
zinnober: chrome green

I have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night.

—Sarah Williams

thestarswerelittlefish:

rare words

acosmist - one who believes that nothing exists
paralian - a person who lives near the sea
aureate - pertaining to the fancy or flowery words used by poets 
dwale - to wander about deliriously
sabaism - the worship of stars
dysphoria - an unwell feeling
aubade - a love song which is sung at dawn
eumoirous - happiness due to being honest and wholesome
mimp - to speak in a prissy manner, usually with pursed lips

(Source: , via avolavit)

I’d cut my soul into a million different pieces just to form a constellation to light your way home.

—Andrea Gibson (via 24ribs)

(Source: word-welder, via sociolab)

azadistan:

Be sure to taste your words before you spit them out.

(Source: pakiswagger, via fearfullymade-locs)

period by KRUNK Interactive